The DA will make a PAIA bid to publicise a security report warning of riots

Democratic Alliance leader, John Steenhuisen, said that it was critical for South Africans to know the details behind the security cluster’s failure in handling the violence and wide-spread looting which broke out two weeks ago.

Protesters gesture towards police officers (not seen) as they burn tyres in Jeppestown, Johannesburg, on 11 July 2021. Picture: Luca Sola/AFP

JOHANNESBURG – The Democratic Alliance (DA) has announced that it will submit an application, under the Promotion of Access to Information Act (PAIA), for the intelligence report submitted by State Security Minister Ayanda Dlodlo warning of the recent unrest and looting to be made public.

Its leader, John Steenhuisen, said that it was critical for South Africans to know the details behind the security cluster’s failure in handling the violence and widespread looting which broke out two weeks ago.

The application deals with the disclosure of information that could reveal if there was a substantial contravention or failure to comply with the law. It also takes into consideration whether public interest outweighs potential harm.

READ MORE:
– Is SA’s security at risk as ANC factional battles play out in security cluster?
– Police Minister Cele – I never received the intelligence warning of looting
– Dlodlo hits back at Cele, insists her dept did its job in warning of violence
– Mapisa-Nqakula: Security cluster was nearly caught with its pants down

Last week, Dlodlo and Police Minister Bheki Cele engaged in a public tit-for-tat over the report, with Cele claiming that she never handed it over.

The country’s state security cluster has opened itself up to more scrutiny over its handling of the recent violence and looting across parts of KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng.

And while Parliament prepares to start an inquiry into the saga, opposition parties have also shared their thoughts, with the DA calling for the report said to have been compiled by the State Security Agency (SSA) to be made public.

Steenhuisen said that there were important questions that needed answers.

“It’s critical that South Africans know the who, the when and the what of this catastrophic failure of our security cluster to protect citizens and property,” He said.

The DA leader argued that making this information public via the Promotion of Access to Information Act would be in the public interest as it was private citizens who bore the brunt of the attacks.

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